Following News Ohio Experienced Worst Job Loss in Nation In November, Non-Partisan Arizona State University Notes Ohio’s Worsening Ranking

Last updated: December 30. 2013 3:18PM - 903 Views
From Jerid Kurtz, Communications Director, Ohio Democratic Party



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COLUMBUS, OHIO – Arizona State University’s non-partisan W.P.Carey School of Business released its monthly state job growth rankings Dec. 23, noting that Ohio plummeted to 46th in the nation in job growth for the month of November.


Today’s disastrous economic news closely follows reports that during November, Ohio lost 12,000 jobs – the worst job loss of any state in the nation – while employment increased in 43 states across the country.


“While the rest of the country continues to recover, under Governor Kasich’s policies Ohio is headed in the wrong direction and now we’ve even fallen to 46th in the nation in job growth,” said Ohio Democratic Party Spokesman Jerid Kurtz. “In Kasich’s economy, more than 427,000 Ohioans are out of work and for the first time in more than three years our state’s unemployment is worse than the rest of the nation’s.”


But despite the state’s struggling economy, Governor Kasich continues to refuse to ask his allies in Washington to extend federal unemployment benefits for the more than 40,000 Ohioans that will see their benefits immediately terminated in five days on December 28th.


“As our state’s economy stalls out, Governor Kasich refuses to pick up the phone and demand Congress continue federal extended unemployment for the more than 40,000 Ohioans set to immediately lose benefits on Saturday,” continued Kurtz. “Ohio deserves a Governor that’s willing to stand up for middle-class families, not just his rich friends.”


Ohio’s continuing economic decline stands in stark contrast to Governor Kasich’s recent claim that “Ohio is going in the right direction folks. You feel it. People across the state feel it. We know it to be true. Now is the time to double down.”


BACKGROUND


2013: Nonpartisan Study Ranked Ohio 46th In Job Creation Over The Previous Year. According to a nonpartisan study by the W.P. Carney School of Business at Arizona State University, Ohio ranked 46th in job creation over the previous year for total nonfarm payroll between November 2012 and November 2013. [Job Growth Update, W. P. Carey School of Business - Arizona State University, 2013]


Ohio Previously Ranked 44th in Job Creation in October And As Low As 48th in March. According to a nonpartisan study by the W.P. Carney School of Business at Arizona State University, Ohio ranked 44th in job creation over the previous year for total nonfarm payroll between October 2012 and October 2013, and as low as 48th between March 2012 and March 2013. [Job Growth Update, W. P. Carey School of Business - Arizona State University, 2013 Archive]


In November, Ohio Experienced The Worst Job Loss In The Nation. In November 2013, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 43 states and decreased in 7 states and the District of Columbia. The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in Ohio (-12,000),followed by North Carolina (-6,500) and Washington (-6,000). [Bureau of Labor and Statistics, 12/20/13]


For The First Time In More Than Three Years, Ohio’s Unemployment Is Worse Than The Nations’. Unemployment in Ohio has been creeping up since April and pulled even with the national rate in August. The October numbers are the first since October 2010 to show Ohio faring worse than the rest of the country. [Cincinnati Enquirer, 11/22/13]


In October, unemployment dropped across the nation in 39 states. Sixteen states saw the jobless rate in October fall to its lowest level in more than four years. In all but two, October unemployment was at its lowest level since late 2008 or the early months of 2009…In all, unemployment dropped from September to last month in 39 states.” [Washington Post, 11/25/13]


But while the rest of the nation recovered in October, only three states, including Ohio, experienced nearly two-year unemployment highs. “And only three states—Arkansas, Oklahoma and Ohio—saw nearly two-year highs.” [Washington Post, 11/25/13]


In August, Ohio Experienced The Second Worst Job Loss In The Nation. In August 2013, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 29 states, decreased in 20 states and the District of Columbia, and was unchanged in Montana. The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in Georgia (-16,100), followed by Ohio (-8,200) and Arizona (-7,900). [Bureau of Labor and Statistics, 9/20/13]


In June, Ohio Experienced The Second Worst Job Loss In The Nation. In June 2013, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 37 states, decreased in 12 states and the District of Columbia, and was unchanged in Arkansas. The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in Tennessee (-16,500), followed by Ohio (-12,500) and New York (-11,400). [Bureau of Labor and Statistics, 7/18/13]


In March, Ohio Experienced The Worst Job Loss In The Nation. In March 2013, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 23 states, decreased in 26 states and the District of Columbia, and was unchanged in New Mexico. The largest over-the-month decrease in employment occurred in Ohio (-20,400), followed by Illinois (-17,800). [Bureau of Labor and Statistics,4/19/13]


October 2013: Ohio Was One Of Only Five States To Show A Negative Three Month Trend In Its Coincident Index [Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia, 2010-2013]


September 2013: Ohio Was One Of Only Seven States To Show A Negative Three Month Trend In Its Coincident Index [Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia, 2010-2013]


Prior To September 2013, The Most Recent Negative Growth In Ohio’s Coincident Index Was September Of 2010 [Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia, 2010-2013]


Coincident Index Combines Four Indicators To Summarize Economic Conditions: Employment, Average Hours Worked In Manufacturing, Unemployment Rate, And Wages. According to Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia “The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia produces a monthly coincident index for each of the 50 states… The coincident indexes combine four state-level indicators to summarize current economic conditions in a single statistic. The four state-level variables in each coincident index are nonfarm payroll employment, average hours worked in manufacturing, the unemployment rate, and wage and salary disbursements deflated by the consumer price index (U.S. city average).” [Federal Reserve Bank Of Philadelphia, accessed 12/3/13]


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